Thursday, July 9, 2015

Photography Workshop: September 23-25

Everyone likes to make nice photos, and nearly everyone has a camera these days. Even the simplest point & shoots are complex enough that many owners don't take advantage of nearly all of the tools embedded in the camera. Learning what makes the camera tick, and how to best exploit its assets, will allow the user to create much better images.

I'm pleased to be joining two truly outstanding photographers, David FitzSimmons and Art Weber, in conducting a photography workshop this fall: September 23-25 at Lakeside Chautauqua on Ohio's Marblehead Peninsula. Lakeside is well-named - it sits on the picturesque shoreline of Lake Erie. Those of you who attended one of the last four Midwest Birding Symposiums will no doubt have fond memories of Lakeside.

We'll cover lots of different subject material: landscapes, all manner of wildlife photography, macro work, flash photography, composition and more. Part of the time will be spent indoors going over techniques, equipment, composition, etc. via liberally illustrated lectures, and a good chunk of our time will be spent out-of-doors practicing. Subject matter abounds in that part of the world, and the field excursions will be a blast.

Photographers of all levels and camera types are welcome! Registration Information is RIGHT HERE. Read on for more information, and a few photos:
As always, click on the image to enlarge
As always, click on the image to enlarge

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Birds always represent a photographic challenge, and we'll learn techniques for freezing the action. Of course, becoming a better nature photographer means learning more about natural history, and we'll do our best to find and learn about lots of flora and fauna. Plenty of migrant birds will be around during the workshop.

White-blotched Heterocampa caterpillar, Heterocampa umbrata

I take scads of shots under cover of darkness, as that's when an entirely different assemblage of animals emerges. Nocturnal work obviously requires expertise with flash, and we'll work with those techniques.

Rosy Maple Moth, Dryocampa rubicunda

Looking at subjects in alternative ways can yield some positively startling photos. Getting past "mug shot" basic documentary shots will really ramp up the quality of one's photos.

Spicebush Swallowtails, Papilio troilus

Composition is always important, whether it be a stunning landscape, a bird, a caterpillar, or butterflies sparring over favored nectar sources.

Again, for workshop details, GO HERE.

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