Saturday, February 25, 2012

The Art of Nature Interpretation

Gifted interpreters can effectively interface between the natural world, and the significant percentage of the population who know little about natural history. A skilled naturalist can effectively and joyously convey the magic of plants and animals in a way that is sure to capture the interest and imagination of all, and thus create more converts to conservation.

I, personally, have never been employed in the capacity of of a professional naturalist, but my interests and career have placed me in roles where I often lead field trips, or otherwise attempt to communicate about nature. Thus, it has been hugely helpful over the years to have the good fortunate of interacting with people who really know their stuff, and are nearly magical in their ability to share the fascinating mysteries of nature.

It was a treat to recently learn of a new natural history program that is every bit as compelling as Sir David Attenborough's BBC programs. Known as "Nature Walk", Dr. Lennie Pepperbottom takes viewers through the splendors of the Colorado mountains, and its treasure trove of flora and fauna. Following is Episode 3, which I thought might be of particular interest to readers of this blog, as Lennie spends some time working with a wild bird. CLICK HERE for the episode. Click HERE and HERE for episodes 1 and 2, which are every bit as fascinating and well crafted.

If you want firsthand field experience with guides who are every bit as accomplished and engaging as Pepperbottom, sign on for the upcoming New River Birding & Nature Festival.

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10 comments:

rebecca said...

I recently finished my Certified Interpretive Guide training and was employed seasonally as a professional naturalist at a couple different places before going back to school, but I can only hope to someday reach the level of skill and effectiveness you describe. Thanks for the links to the videos - I'll be sure to check them out.

Carole said...

I was especially interested to learn that most birds can kill you with their beaks.

Jim McCormac said...

Yes, Carole, one of many fascinating facts presented by Dr. Pepperbottom.

Dave said...

Jim, you ARE a great guide and I've learned so much by walking with you. Thanks for all you do.

Dave said...

By the way...that was the neatest learning video I have seen today. Nature is neat.
I have a new idea for my blog now. Neat.
Thanks...

nina said...

And you, too, Jim, are nearly magical in your ability to share , as well.

denapple said...

We just returned from the Region 3 workshops for the National Association of Interpreters, since my husband and I are both Certifited Interpretive Guides. I am determined to learn the Scat Rap and use it out on the trail!

A.L. Gibson said...

Haha! Oh, Jim, if you only knew how many times I've been told about these by friends and relatives who like to poke a bit of good-natured fun at me. I get a good chuckle out of them, glad to see you do too!

Heather said...

Jim, while you may never have been employed as a professional naturalist, your willingness to guide so many of us, both personally and virtually through your blog, with such enthusiasm and unbridled curiosity makes you one of the best naturalists I've ever met. You truly are an inspiration.

Heather said...

Mr. Pepperbottom should learn some Jim McCormac-style jokes - might help fill the dead spots in the videos... Neat!